Mother & Baby

"Most People Have No Idea How Good Their Body Is Designed To Feel"

Kevin Trudeau


Pelvic Girdle Pain ( PGP)

How do I know if I have pelvic girdle pain?
Symptoms of pelvic girdle pain (PGP)
Difficulty walking (a waddling gait).
Pain when putting weight on one leg, such as climbing stairs.
Pain and/or difficulty in straddle movements, such as getting in and out of the bath.
Clicking or grinding in the pelvic area.
Limited and painful hip abduction.

Pelvic Girdle Pain ( PGP)

Where is pelvic girdle pain located?
The pelvic girdle is a ring of bones around your body at the base of your spine. PGP is pain in the front and/or the back of your pelvis that can also affect other areas such as the hips or thighs. It can affect the sacroiliac joints at the back and/or the symphysis pubis joint at the front.

Does pelvic girdle pain go away?
As mentioned above, PGP is not caused by hormones and rarely goes away without appropriate treatment (although some women find that after birth the symptoms are less obvious, although they seem to be in the minority).

What does pelvic pain feel like?
The pain occurs when the muscles in the uterus (womb) contract or tighten, and often feels like cramping or heaviness in the pelvic area, lower back or stomach. Despite it being a typical add-on of getting your period, if the pain is severe, it could be a sign of something more serious, such as endometriosis.

How do I know if I have pelvic girdle pain?
Symptoms of pelvic girdle pain (PGP)
1. Difficulty walking (a waddling gait).
2. Pain when putting weight on one leg, such as climbing stairs.
3. Pain and/or difficulty in straddle movements, such as getting in and out of the bath.
4. Clicking or grinding in the pelvic area.
Limited and painful hip abduction.

How do you get rid of pelvic pain during pregnancy?
How to Reduce and Treat Your Pelvic Pain During Pregnancy
1. Exercise in water. ...
2. Use pelvic pilates style exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor, stomach, back, and hip muscles.
Use equipment such as crutches, if necessary.
3. Rest when possible.
4. Wear supportive, flat shoes

5.  Modify the way you move.

It might sound simple, but modifying the way you move in your everyday life can have a dramatic difference on your pain.

Keep your pelvis & hips level during all movements.
Avoid movements that create shearing through the pelvis like stairs and standing on one leg.
If you have to take the stairs, do one step at a time.
Sit down to put your underpants, pants and shoes on.
Sit in your car by lowering your bottom onto the seat first then lifting your legs in carefully.
Sit on the edge of the bath to get in rather than stepping over the edge.
Avoid carrying a toddler on one hip as much as you can.
Avoid lifting anything heavy or awkward.
Keep your knees together when you are rolling in bed.
To get out of bed, roll onto your side, drop your legs over the edge of the bed and push yourself up to sitting using your arms.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT OR CALL US FOR A CONSULTATION ON 01484 517808